Hindmarsh Island, South Australia Island magic

I hadn’t realised it was so long ago since I did a post here. Has nothing been going on or have I been too busy? A mixture of both really. I have been immersed in genealogy and the more I try to document my family the more I find. I continue to do my 12 of 12 project each month. I am still involved with sending and receiving postcards though I am not as active as I was previously.
I am doing another online class through FutureLearn called “The European discovery of China

So really a lot of nothing.

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I am doing an online class and it has a royal food theme.

Week 4 was still in the Georgian period with George III. The recipe I cooked this week was Barley Soup

Stock

I started with an already prepared good quality beef stock from the supermarket

Add the barley

I added the barley to the stock and bought to the boil.

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Simmered for 40 minutes until the barley was soft and the stock had reduced by half. This was too thick so I added more water and bought it back to the boil. Added the raisins and onion and while the recipe didn’t mention cooking the onion I let it all boil for a few minutes as I didn’t want raw onion in my soup.

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The finished soup with cream and parsley added.

It tasted okay, a little bland and was very full of barley. If I make this again I would also add some vegetables and meat. It would make a good stew.

Week 5’s recipe I am not going to make. It is a Victoria sponge and having made sponges previously all that was really different was in the execution and that it was mixed using your hand. If I had made the sponge I would have had to eat it all myself.

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I am doing an online class and it has a royal food theme.

Week 3 was the English Georgian period and the cook-along recipe was Georgian hot chocolate.

In the pot

I used an Australian Tawny Port with dark cooking chocolate buttons (they had the 80% cocoa content required). The white flecks are the flour and I really can’t see what difference that minute amount of flour made. I also didn’t have a special chocolate pot they used to use to make mine in so used a milk pot.IMG_1396

After gently heating and melting the chocolate until small bubbles appeared around the edge of the pan it was all given a whisk to aerate.

Pouring the hot chocolate into a glass smelt wonderful. I didn’t have a fancy china cup so a milk-shake glass served the purpose.

The hot chocolate drink tasted wonderful and the port in it gave me a buzz for the rest of the afternoon. The Georgians had this for breakfast and other times during the day and it certainly would have set you buzzing for the rest of the day. It was similar to a mulled wine but with the richness of chocolate. Yum!

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